A Self-made Millionaire Identifies The №1 Reason Most People Fail

 · 5 min read

If he says it is the №1 reason, then it truly is. He has earned the credibility and wisdom to say that.

He is a self-made millionaire. And as of 2020 at the age of 61, Grant Cardone’s net worth figure is a reported $300 million. He is known for his massive real estate, Cardone Capital, a $750 million real estate empire.

He is also a sales coach, author, and motivational speaker.

On top of all those massive achievements, he believes in God and also a very successful family man.

Best of all, in his own words, he “… grew up poor.”

His rise to fortune and fame was met with many obstacles, yet his perseverance and devotion to making a deal let him be the business mogul he is today.

Indeed, if he says it is the №1 reason, then it is.


Grant’s Cardon’s №1 Reason Most People Fail

“Not showing up is the №1 reason most people fail, and it’s a very common and easy mistake to make.

Showing up, again and again, requires faith and persistence, but it also creates discipline.

You’ll never conquer what you don’t move toward. If you don’t make any moves, you’ll become stagnant, unmotivated, and ultimately spiral downward.”

— Grant Cardone.


Why Most People Fail to Show Up

People don’t intentionally just fail to show up. They don’t just wake up one morning and stops doing what they have always wanted to do all their lives. Nobody does that.

Having a lot of money won’t ever come between most people and their life work — because to them, it is more than work; it is what keeps their soul breathing.

Take Bill Gates, for instance. He has got enough money that will probably last him another lifetime. Yet he still read make out time for personal development and keeps an active blog where he shares ideas and lessons on life and business.

There is only one notorious culprit that drains people’s energy and keeps them from doing showing up each day to do their work. Here is it:

Failure.

In other words, consistently achieving less than your expectations. There is nothing more frustrating.

And it is intense when other people in the same field or company are recording astronomical levels of success under the same circumstances.

There is no way anyone won’t be discouraged and not want to get out of bed the next morning.

The truth is, failure, and feeling like one is a great demotivator. It demoralizes people like no other.

And there is one terrible thing about failing. It reinforces the vicious cycle by discouraging people from the very action that can lead to their success and freedom.

Eventually, they feel like a helpless loser and so fail to show up. And according to Grant Cardone, it is the №1 reason most of them fail.

The good news is that you can crush it.


How to crush the vicious cycle and go on to achieve your audacious goals

First, we must realize that how and what we feel about a situation is a result of how we interpret them.

And in any situation, we either feel like a winner or a loser based on the parameters we choose to interpret our results.

For instance, here is…

… the №1 reason most writers on Medium fail to succeed

Every writer has a goal to be more successful. But… it is easy to feel like a failure and get discouraged if the parameter to achieving that goal is in terms of how much money Medium sends them every month, through the Medium Partner Program.

Why?

That thinking gets more than 89.9% of writers into the “failure zone” — the less than $100 earners.

Because according to Medium’s report, only about 5.7% of writers earn a monthly income of $100 and above.

That realization alone is paralyzing and unhealthy for especially the young writers on the platform. (Talking from experience).

If they wallow in that thinking long enough, discouragement will step into their mind and prevent them from showing up and doing the very work that will help them become successful and increase their earning potential.

So what’s the solution?

If you can’t win the game, change the rules and you will win.

It is that simple a strategy.

How?

Instead of how much you earn, focus on how many stories you publish every week. In other words, measure your success in terms of the number of stories you publish each week.

And the best part? Reward yourself every time you meet your expectations. And reward yourself handsomely each time you go beyond those expectations.

Let’s say you aim to publish (or submit) 5 articles every week.

As you hit that target, reward yourself. Buy yourself a coffee.

Then if you are so pumped to go beyond 5 and hit 6, or 7 and upwards, reward yourself handsomely. Buy yourself a coffee from Starbucks, popcorn, and go see a movie.

In psychology, it is called positive reinforcement.

And I bet you, you will be more eager to write a lot more stories in the following week.

And something more:

You will be far more successful as a writer. Also, your income will go up at the end of the month.

There is just one secret to success in writing — Consistency.

If you can be consistent, not even the devil can stop you from achieving your goals.

5 Daily Habit to Becoming a Successful and Consistent Writer


And here is a pro tip.

Identify the areas that make you feel like a loser and stay away from them.

Tell me where I am going to die, so I will never go there. — Charlie Munger

For me, it is my stats. And right now, I am including my medium partner program section (my earning dashboard).

And… it works.

That is how to crush it. And tap dance your way to success.

Change the rules and it becomes easy for you to show up.
And as you get consistent, success will wrap her hands around our neck, and whisper in your ears, “… where have you been all this while?”

Go try it.

Don’t keep your success waiting…


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s